26. Ladyface [Association]

26. Ladyface [Association]

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old, volume 1, Prince Goodspeaker, Stories 1-50

Once upon time, the King of Benares had a royal bull elephant who was kind, patient and harmless. Along with his sweet disposition, he had a lovely gentle face. So he was affectionately known as ‘Ladyface’.

One night, a gang of robbers met together just outside the elephant shed. In the darkness they talked about their plans for robbing people. They spoke of beating and killing, and bragged that they had given up ordinary goodness so they would have no pity on their victims. They used rough he-man type gutter language, intended to scare people and show how tough they were.

Since the nights were quiet, Ladyface had nothing else to do but listen to all these terrible plans and violent rough talk. He listened carefully and, as elephants do, remembered it all. Having been brought up to obey and respect human beings, he thought these men were also to be obeyed and respected, even as teachers.

After this went on for several nights, Ladyface decided that the correct thing to do was to become rough and cruel. This usually happens to one who associates with those of a low-minded cruel nature. It happens especially to a gentle one who wishes to please others.

A ‘mahout’ is what the Indians call the special trainer and caretaker of a particular elephant. They are usually very close. Early one morning, Ladyface’s mahout came to see him as usual. The elephant, his mind filled with the night’s robber-talk, suddenly attacked his mahout. He picked him up in his trunk, squeezed the breath out of him, and smashed him to the ground, killing him instantly. Then he picked up two other attendants, one after another, and killed them just as ferociously.

Word spread quickly through the city that the once adored Ladyface had suddenly gone mad and become a frightening man-killer. The people ran to the king for help.

It just so happened that the king had an intelligent minister who was known for his understanding of animals. So he called for him and asked him to go and determine what sickness or other condition had caused his favorite elephant to become so insanely violent.

This minister was the Bodhisatta, the Enlightenment Being. Arriving at the elephant shed, he spoke gentle soothing words to Ladyface, and calmed him down. He examined him and found him in perfect physical health. As he spoke kindly to Ladyface, he noticed that the elephant perked up his ears and paid very close attention. It was almost as if the poor animal were starved for the sound of gentle words. So the understanding minister figured out that the elephant must have been hearing the violent words or seeing the violent actions of those he mistook for teachers.

He asked the elephant guards, “Have you seen anyone hanging around this elephant shed, at night or any other time?" “Yes, minister," they replied, “for the last couple of weeks a gang of robbers has been meeting here. We were afraid to do anything, since they were such mean rough characters. Ladyface could hear their every word."

The minister returned immediately to the king. He said, “My lord king, your favourite elephant, Ladyface, is in perfect physical health. I have discovered that it was by hearing the rough and vulgar talk of thieves during many nights, that he has learned to be violent and cruel. Unwholesome associations often lead to unwholesome thoughts and actions."

The king asked, “What is to be done?" The minister said, “Well my lord, now we must reverse the process. We must send wise men and monks, who have a high-minded kind nature, to spend just as many nights outside the elephant shed. There they should talk of the value of ordinary goodness and patience, leading to compassion, loving-kindness and harmlessness."

So it was carried out. For several nights the kind wise ones spoke of those wonderful qualities. They used only gentle and refined language, intended to bring peacefulness and comfort to others.

Lo and behold, hearing this pleasant conversation for several nights, Ladyface the bull elephant became even more peaceful and pleasant than before!

Seeing this total change, the minister reported it to the king, saying, “My lord, Ladyface is now even more harmless and sweet than before. Now he is as gentle as a lamb!"

The king said, “It is wonderful indeed that such a madly violent elephant can be changed by associating with wise men and monks." He was amazed that his minister seemed to be able to read the mind of an elephant. So he rewarded him appropriately.

The moral is: As rough talk infects with violence, so do gentle words heal with harmlessness.

26. Ladyface [Association]

Link: https://hhdorjechangbuddhaiiiinfo.com/2022/05/16/26-ladyface-association/

INTERPRETER’S INTRODUCTION – BUDDHIST TALES FOR YOUNG AND OLD, VOLUME 1, STORIES 1-50

#Buddhisttalesforyoungandold #Buddhiststories #storiesforkids #moralstories #Buddha #Jatakastories #PansiyaPanasJataka

25. Dirty Bath Water [Cleanliness]

25. Dirty Bath Water [Cleanliness]

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old, volume 1, Prince Goodspeaker, Stories 1-50

Once upon a time, in a kingdom in India, the finest of the royal horses was taken down to the river to be bathed. The grooms took him to the same shallow pool where they always washed him.

However, just before they arrived, a filthy dirty horse had been washed in the same spot. He had been caught in the countryside and had never had a good bath in all his life.

The fine royal horse sniffed the air. He knew right away that some filthy wild horse had bathed there and fouled the water. So he was disgusted and refused to be washed at that place.

The grooms tried their best to get him into the water, but could do nothing with him. So they went to the king and complained that the fine well-trained royal stallion had suddenly become stubborn and unmanageable.

It just so happened that the king had an intelligent minister who was known for his understanding of animals. So he called for him and said, “Please go and see what has happened to my number one horse. Find out if he is sick or what is the reason he refuses to be bathed. Of all my horses, I thought this one was of such high quality that he would never let himself sink into dirtiness. There must be something wrong."

The minister went down to the riverside bathing pool immediately. He found that the stately horse was not sick, but in perfect health. He noticed also that he was deliberately breathing as little as possible. So he sniffed the air and smelled a slight foul odour. Investigating further, he found that it came from the unclean water in the bathing pool. So he figured out that another very dirty horse must have been washed there, and that the king’s horse was too fond of cleanliness to bathe in dirty water.

The minister asked the horse grooms, “Has any other horse been bathed at this spot today?" “Yes," they replied, “before we arrived, a dirty wild horse was bathed here." The minister told them, “My dear grooms, this is a fine royal horse who loves cleanliness. He does not wish to bathe in dirty water. So the thing to do is to take him up river, where the water is fresh and clean, and wash him there."

They followed his instructions, and the royal horse was pleased to bathe in the new place.

The minister returned to the king and told what had happened. Then he said, “You were correct your majesty, this fine horse was indeed of such high quality that he would not let himself sink into dirtiness!"

The king was amazed that his minister seemed to be able to read the mind of a horse. So he rewarded him appropriately.

The moral is: Even animals value cleanliness.

25. Dirty Bath Water [Cleanliness]

Link: https://hhdorjechangbuddhaiiiinfo.com/2022/05/10/25-dirty-bath-water-cleanliness/

INTERPRETER’S INTRODUCTION – BUDDHIST TALES FOR YOUNG AND OLD, VOLUME 1, STORIES 1-50

#Buddhisttalesforyoungandold #Buddhiststories #storiesforkids #moralstories #Buddha #Jatakastories #PansiyaPanasJataka

23, 24. The Great Horse Knowing-One [Courage]

23, 24. The Great Horse Knowing-One [Courage]

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old, volume 1, Prince Goodspeaker, Stories 1-50

Once upon a time, King Brahmadatta ruled in Benares, in northern India. He had a mighty horse, who had been born in the land of Sindh, in the Indus River valley of western India. Indeed, this horse was the Enlightenment Being.

As well as being big and strong, he was very intelligent and wise. When he was still young, people noticed that he always seemed to know what his rider wanted before being told. So he was called Knowing-one.

He was considered the greatest of the royal horses and was given the very best of everything. His stall was decorated and was always kept clean and beautiful. Horses are usually faithful to their masters. Knowing-one was especially loyal and was grateful for how well the king cared for him. Of all the royal horses, Knowing-one was also the bravest. So the king respected and trusted him.

It came to pass that seven neighbouring kings joined together to make war on King Brahmadatta. Each king brought four great armies — an elephant cavalry, a horse cavalry, a chariot brigade and ranks of foot soldiers. Together the seven kings, with all their armies, surrounded the city of Benares.

King Brahmadatta assembled his ministers and advisers to make plans for defending the kingdom. They advised him, “Do not surrender. We must fight to protect our high positions. But you should not risk your royal person in the beginning. Instead, send out the champion of all the knights to represent you on the battlefield. If he fails, only then must you yourself go."

So the king called the champion to him and asked, “Can you be victorious over these seven kings?" The knight replied, “If you permit me to ride out on the bravest and wisest, the great horse Knowing-one, only then can I win the battle." The king agreed and said, “My champion, it is up to you and Knowing-one to save the country in its time of danger. Take with you whatever you need."

The champion knight went to the royal stables. He ordered that Knowing-one be well fed and dressed in protective armor, with all the finest trimmings. Then he bowed respectfully and climbed into the beautiful saddle.

Knowing-one knew the situation. He thought, “These seven kings have come to attack my country and my king, who feeds and cares for and trusts me. Not only the seven kings, but also their large and powerful armies threaten my king and all in Benares. I cannot let them win. But I also cannot permit the champion knight to kill those kings. Then I too would share in the unwholesome action of taking the lives of others, in order to win an ordinary victory. Instead, I will teach a new way. I will capture all seven kings without killing anyone. That would be a truly great victory!"

Then the Knowing-one spoke to his rider. “Sir knight, let us win this battle in a new way, without destroying life. You must only capture each king, one at a time, and remain firmly on my back. Let me find the true course through the many armies. Watch me as you ride, and I will show you the courage that goes beyond the old way, the killing way!"

As he spoke of ‘a new way’, and ‘the true course’, and ‘the courage that goes beyond’, it seemed the noble steed became larger than life. He reared up majestically on his powerful hind legs, and looked down on all the armies surrounding the city. The eyes of all were drawn to this magnificent one. The earth trembled as his front hoofs returned to the ground and he charged into the midst of the four armies of the first king. He seemed to have the speed of lightning, the might of a hundred elephants, and the glorious confidence of one from some other world.

The elephants could remember no such horse as this, and so the elephant cavalry retreated in fear. The horses knew that this their relative was the worthy master of them all, and so the horse cavalry and the chariot brigade stood still and bowed as the Great Being passed. And the ranks of foot-soldiers scattered like flies before a strong wind.

The first king hardly knew what had happened, before he was easily captured and brought back into the city of Benares. And so too with the second, third, fourth and fifth kings.

In the same way the sixth king was captured. But one of his loyal bodyguards leaped out from hiding and thrust his sword deep into the side of the brave Knowing-one. With blood streaming from the wound, he carried the champion knight and the captured sixth king back to the city.

When the knight saw the terrible wound, he suddenly became afraid to ride the weakened Knowing-one against the seventh king. So he began to dress in armour another powerful war horse, who was really just as big as Knowing-one.

Seeing this, though suffering in great pain from his deadly wound, Knowing-one thought, “This champion knight has lost his courage so quickly. He has not understood the true nature of my power — the knowledge that true peace is only won by peaceful means. He tries to defeat the seventh king and his armies in the ordinary way, riding an ordinary horse.

“After taking the first step of giving up the killing of living beings, I cannot stop part way. My great effort to teach a new way would disappear like a line drawn in water!"

The great horse Knowing-one spoke to the champion knight. “Sir knight, the seventh king and his armies are the mightiest of all. Riding an ordinary horse, even if you slaughter a thousand men and animals, you will be defeated. I, of the mighty tribe of Sindh horses, the one called Knowing-one, only I can pass through them harming none, and bring back the seventh king alive!"

The champion knight regained his courage. The brave horse struggled to his feet, in great pain. While the blood continued to flow, he reared and charged through the four armies, and the knight brought back the last of the seven warlike kings. Again all those in his path were spared from harm. Seeing their seven kings in captivity, all the armies laid down their weapons and asked for peace.

Realizing that the great horse Knowing-one would not live through the night, King Brahmadatta went to see him. He had raised him from a colt, so he loved him. When he saw that he was dying, his eyes filled with tears.

Knowing-one said, “My lord king, I have served you well. And I have gone beyond and shown a new way. Now you must grant my last request. You must not kill these seven kings, even though they have wronged you. For a bloody victory sows the seeds of the next war. Forgive their attack on you, let them return to their kingdoms, and may you all live in peace from now on.

“Whatever reward you would give to me, give instead to the champion knight. Do only wholesome deeds, be generous, honour the Truth, and kill no living being. Rule with justice and compassion."

Then he closed his eyes and breathed his last. The king burst into tears, and all mourned his passing. With the highest honours, they burned the body of the great horse Knowing-one — the Enlightenment Being.

King Brahmadatta had the seven kings brought before him. They too honored the great one, who had defeated their vast armies without spilling a drop of blood, except his own. In his memory they made peace, and never again did these seven kings and Brahmadatta make war on each other.

The moral is: True peace is only won by peaceful means.

23, 24. The Great Horse Knowing-One [Courage]

Link: https://hhdorjechangbuddhaiiiinfo.com/2022/05/03/23-24-the-great-horse-knowing-one-courage/

INTERPRETER’S INTRODUCTION – BUDDHIST TALES FOR YOUNG AND OLD, VOLUME 1, STORIES 1-50

#Buddhisttalesforyoungandold #Buddhiststories #storiesforkids #moralstories #Buddha #Jatakastories #PansiyaPanasJataka

22. The Dog King Silver [Justice]

22. The Dog King Silver [Justice]

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old, volume 1, Prince Goodspeaker, Stories 1-50

Once upon time, the King of Benares went to his pleasure garden in his fancy decorated chariot. He loved this chariot, mostly because of the rich hand-worked leather belts and straps.

On this occasion, he stayed in his pleasure garden all day long and into the evening. It was late when he finally got back to the palace. So the chariot was left outside in the compound all night, instead of being locked up properly.

During the night it rained heavily, and the leather got wet, swelled up, became soft, and gave off an odour. The pampered palace dogs smelled the delicious leather scent and came down into the compound. They chewed off and devoured the soft wet chariot straps. Before daybreak, they returned unseen to their places in the palace.

When the king woke up and came down, he saw that the leather had been chewed off and eaten by dogs. He called the servants and demanded to know how this happened.

Since they were supposed to watch the palace dogs, the servants were afraid to blame them. Instead, they made up a story that stray dogs, the mutts and mongrels of the city, had come into the grounds through sewers and storm drains. They were the ones who had eaten the fancy leather.

The king flew into a terrible rage. He was so overcome by anger that he decided to take vengeance against all dogs. So he decreed that whenever anyone in the city saw a dog, he was to kill him or her at once!

The people began killing dogs. The dogs could not understand why suddenly they were being killed. Later that day, they learned of the king’s decree. They became very frightened and retreated to the cemetery just outside the city. This was where their leader lived, the Dog King Silver.

Silver was king not because he was the biggest or strongest or toughest. He was average in size, with sleek silver fur, sparkling black eyes and alert pointed ears. He walked with great dignity, that brought admiration and respect from men as well as dogs. In his long life he had learned much, and was able to concentrate his mind on what is most important. So he became the wisest of all the dogs, as well as the one who cared most for the others. Those were the reasons he was king of the dogs.

In the cemetery, the dogs were in a panic. They were frightened to death. The Dog King Silver asked them why this was. They told him all about the chariot straps and the king’s decree, and the people killing them whenever they saw them.

King Silver knew there was no way to get into the well-guarded palace grounds. So he understood that the leather must have been eaten by the dogs living inside the palace.

He thought, “We dogs know that, no matter how different we may appear, somehow we are all related. So now I must make my greatest effort to save the lives of all these poor dogs, my relatives. There is no one to save them but me."

He comforted them by saying, “Do not be afraid. I will save you all. Stay here in the cemetery and don’t go into the city. I will tell the King of Benares who are the thieves and who are the innocent. The truth will save us all."

Before setting out, he went to a different part of the cemetery to be alone. Having practiced goodness all his life, and trained his mind, he now concentrated very hard and filled his mind with feelings of loving-kindness. He thought, “May all dogs be well and happy, and may all dogs be safe. I go to the palace for the sake of dogs and men alike. No one shall attack or harm me."

Then the Dog King Silver began walking slowly through the streets of Benares. Because his mind was focused, he had no fear. Because of his long life of goodness, he walked with a calm dignity that demanded respect. And because of the warm glow of loving-kindness that all the people sensed, no one felt the rising of anger or any intention to harm him. Instead, they marvelled as the Great Being passed, and wondered how it could be so!

It was as if the whole city were entranced. With no obstruction, the Dog King Silver walked right past the palace guards, into the royal hall of justice, and sat down calmly underneath the king’s throne itself! The King of Benares was impressed by such courage and dignity. So when servants came to remove the dog, he ordered them to let him remain.

Then the Dog King Silver came out from under the throne and faced the mighty King of Benares. He bowed respectfully and asked, “Your majesty, was it you who ordered that all the dogs of the city should be killed?" “It was I," replied the king. “What crime did the dogs commit?" asked the dog king. “Dogs ate my rich beautiful chariot leather and straps." “Do you know which dogs did this?" asked King Silver. “No one knows," said the King of Benares.

“My lord," said the dog, “for a king such as you, who wishes to be righteous, is it right to have all dogs killed in the place of the few guilty ones? Does this do justice to the innocent ones?" The king replied, as if it made perfect sense to him, “Since I do not know which dogs destroyed my leather, only by ordering the killing of all dogs can I be sure of punishing the guilty. The king must have justice!"

The Dog King Silver paused for a moment, before challenging the king with the crucial question – “My lord king, is it a fact that you have ordered all dogs to be killed, or are there some who are not to be killed?" The king suddenly became a little uneasy as he was forced to admit, before his whole court, “It is true that most dogs are to be killed, but not all. The fine pure-breeds of my palace are to be spared."

Then the dog king said, “My lord, before you said that all dogs were to be killed, in order to insure that the guilty would be punished. Now you say that your own palace dogs are to be spared. This shows that you have gone wrong in the way of prejudice. For a king who wishes to be righteous, it is wrong to favor some over others. The king’s justice must be unbiased, like an honest scale. Although you have decreed an impartial death to all dogs, in fact this is only the slaughter of poor dogs. Your rich palace dogs are unjustly saved, while the poor are wrongly killed!"

Recognizing the truth of the dog king’s words, the King of Benares asked, “Are you wise enough to know which dogs ate my leather straps and belts?" “Yes my lord, I do know," said he, “it could only be your own favorite palace dogs, and I can prove it." “Do so," said the king.

The dog king asked to have the palace pets brought into the hall of justice. He asked for a mixture of buttermilk and grass, and for the dogs to be made to eat it. Lo and behold, when this was done they vomited up partly digested pieces of the king’s leather straps!

Then the Dog King Silver said, “My lord, no poor dogs from the city can enter the well-guarded palace compound. You were blinded by prejudice. It is your dogs who are the guilty ones. Nevertheless, to kill any living being is an unwholesome thing to do. This is because of what we dogs know, but men do not seem to know – that somehow all life is related, so all living beings deserve the same respect as relatives."

The whole court was amazed by what had just taken place. The King of Benares was suddenly overcome by a rare feeling of humility. He bowed before the dog king and said, “Oh great king of dogs, I have never seen anyone such as you, one who combines perfect wisdom with great compassion. Truly, your justice is supreme. I offer my throne and the kingdom of Benares to you!"

The Enlightenment Being replied, “Arise my lord, I have no desire for a human crown. If you wish to show your respect for me, you should be a just and merciful ruler. It would help if you begin to purify your mind by practising the ‘Five Training Steps’. These are to give up entirely the five unwholesome actions: destroying life, taking what is not given, sexual wrong-doing, speaking falsely, and drunkenness."

The king followed the teachings of the wise dog king. He ruled with great respect for all living beings. He ordered that whenever he ate, all dogs, those of the palace and those of the city, were to be fed as well. This was the beginning of the faithfulness between dogs and men that has lasted to this day.

The moral is: Prejudice leads to injustice, wisdom leads to justice.

22. The Dog King Silver [Justice]

Link: https://hhdorjechangbuddhaiiiinfo.com/2022/04/26/22-the-dog-king-silver-justice/

INTERPRETER’S INTRODUCTION – BUDDHIST TALES FOR YOUNG AND OLD, VOLUME 1, STORIES 1-50

#Buddhisttalesforyoungandold #Buddhiststories #storiesforkids #moralstories #Buddha #Jatakastories #PansiyaPanasJataka

21. The Tree that Acted Like a Hunter [Impatience]

21. The Tree that Acted Like a Hunter [Impatience]

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old, volume 1, Prince Goodspeaker, Stories 1-50

Once upon a time, there was an antelope who lived in the deep forest. He ate the fruits that fell from the trees. There was one tree that had become his favorite.

In the same area there was a hunter who captured and killed antelopes and deer. He put down fruit as bait under a tree. Then he waited, hiding in the branches above. He held a rope noose hanging down to the ground around the fruits. When an animal ate the fruit, the hunter tightened the noose and caught him.

Early one morning the antelope came to his favorite tree in search of fruits to eat. He did not see that the hunter was hiding in it, with his noose-trap ready. Even though he was hungry, the antelope was very careful. He was on the lookout for any possible danger. He saw the delicious looking ripe fruits at the foot of his favorite tree. He wondered why no animal had yet eaten any, and so he was afraid something was wrong.

The hiding hunter saw the antelope approaching from a distance. Seeing him stop and take great care, he was afraid he would not be able to trap him. He was so anxious that he began throwing fruits in the direction of the antelope, trying to lure him into coming closer.

But this was a pretty smart antelope. He knew that fruits only fall straight down when they fall from trees. Since these fruits were flying towards him, he knew there was danger. So he examined the tree itself very carefully, and saw the hunter in the branches. However, he pretended not to see him.

He spoke in the direction of the tree. “Oh my dear fruit tree, you used to give me your fruits by letting them fall straight down to the ground. Now, throwing them towards me, you do not act at all like a tree! Since you have changed your habits, I too will change mine. I will get my fruits from a different tree from now on, one that still acts like a tree!"

The hunter realized his mistake and saw that the antelope had outsmarted him. This angered him and he yelled out, “You may escape me this time, you clever antelope, but I’ll get you next time for sure!"

The antelope realized that, by getting so angry, the hunter had given himself away a second time. So he spoke in the direction of the tree again. “Not only don’t you act like a tree, but you act like a hunter! You foolish humans, who live by killing animals. You do not understand that killing the innocent brings harm also to you, both in this life and by rebirth in a hell world. It is clear that we antelopes are far wiser than you. We eat fruits, we remain innocent of killing others, and we avoid the harmful results."

So saying, the careful antelope leaped into the thick forest and was gone.

The moral is: The wise remain innocent.

21. The Tree that Acted Like a Hunter [Impatience]

Link: https://hhdorjechangbuddhaiiiinfo.com/2022/04/19/21-the-tree-that-acted-like-a-hunter-impatience/

INTERPRETER’S INTRODUCTION – BUDDHIST TALES FOR YOUNG AND OLD, VOLUME 1, STORIES 1-50

#Buddhisttalesforyoungandold #Buddhiststories #storiesforkids #moralstories #Buddha #Jatakastories #PansiyaPanasJataka

出家人带居士去找“神仙”看病,怪哉

出家人带居士去找“神仙”看病,怪哉

近日,好友来访,他一脸不悦,说要找我聊聊。我请他入座,泡茶、上水果招待,然后笑眯眯地问:“老兄遇到了什么难事?”

“你知道,我是支持老伴和小女儿学佛的。”他开口就吓了我一跳。发生了何事?他是来找我“算账”的,还是来“吐苦水”的?我脑海里迅速闪过了近期所做的事情,好像没有什么地方“得罪”他的。

我耐心地对他说:“老兄,你慢慢说,我洗耳恭听。”

原来,他老伴腿脚不方便,小女儿便带妈妈去寺庙参加观世音菩萨成道日的庆祝法会,消灾祈福。结果,返家后,小女儿闷闷不乐。他询问之下才知道,老伴消灾祈福没成功,反而被一个“大仙”骗了钱。


参加法会后,有一位出家人知道了她们想医病的情况,就主动“请缨”带她们去找一位姓冯的“大仙”。据说这个“冯大仙”不仅能为人查因果,还能治病。“冯大仙”在给她妈妈看腿的时候,说有两个堕胎婴灵附在她妈妈腿上,所以走路不方便,当场就收了660元。“冯大仙”说,把两个堕胎婴灵给弄走,她妈妈走路就没问题了。可结果呢,她妈妈的腿病一点也不见转好。小女儿越想越觉得那660元花得太冤了!所以一直闷闷不乐。她还有疑惑未解:“为什么寺庙的出家人要推荐一个‘女神仙’给妈妈看病?难道佛菩萨还没有‘女神仙’厉害?

听完友人的讲述,我想到当今社会上,被这样伪善的出家人欺骗和误导,被所谓的“大仙”坑害的人多如牛毛。他女儿还算是有些思考力的,看见妈妈的腿没有改变就知道上当受骗了。可是,很多人被骗了还不知道。

这个出家人真的胆大包天,不怕因果,存在很严重的知见问题,让我细细道来。

这个出家人犯了“认佛法与外道混修”的邪恶知见和“认病者不需吃药”“认大菩萨不如山神护力强”的错误知见。他把正规的佛法与外道混在一起修,把看病、治病的希望放在一个自称“大仙”的人身上,生病不去医院看病就违背科学了,还说什么“能查因果,还能治病”。请问这个“大仙”仙寿多少?她有何证量功夫证明自己的本事?她是阿罗汉了吗?大言不惭就查因果、治病。她先把自己的“生死大患”治一治吧!连阿罗汉都不是,更何况要跟佛菩萨相比呢?这个差距实在是太大太大了,用一粒尘埃和巍巍泰山之隔还远远不能形容!这个出家人伙同“冯大仙”一起坑害信众,毫无菩提心可言。他披着出家人的衣服,做违背佛教教义的事,是个地地道道的“佛教混子”。

“你们不要见到剃了头的就叫和尚、比丘尼,里面有很多普通的众生,也有很多邪恶的人的,也有很多不邪恶、但是又是纯粹的凡夫意识……” 南无第三世多杰羌佛在《新年说法:我身口意都符合真修行吗?能成就解脱还是遭恶业苦果?》中提出警醒。

南无第三世多杰羌佛把出家人归为四类:一、真正的出家人,为追求成就解脱而出家,身口意符合真正的修行;二、为生活所逼或混日子的出家人,这里又有两种情况:有一种就真正走上正道,修行学佛;另外一种是走过场,其实一点佛法的真谛、修行的道理都不懂,混日子而已;三、因犯某种事情,为躲避而逃避的出家人,这种人也有真正学好了佛法的,可是也有出了家还是堕落的;四、波旬魔王的子孙投胎转世而出家,他们外表是比丘、比丘尼,但实际上是魔子魔孙,篡改经书,乱讲佛法,骗取众生的钱财等等。

对照友人妻女的遭遇,我想,她们碰到的绝不是真正的出家人。她们遇到的那个出家人不懂佛法,抱着邪见误导了众生还不自知,或者他本来就是波旬魔王的子孙,转世投胎加入僧团来破坏佛法的,就是来坑蒙拐骗的。

学佛修行人要明信因果。生病是我们的身体四大不调了,要去医院找正规

医生看病,不要被宣扬怪力乱神的“神棍”骗了。我们要多恭闻南无第三世多杰羌佛的法音,恭读《学佛》《解脱大手印》和《什么叫修行》等法著,树立正知正见,依教奉行,多行善事、佛事。只有树立了正知正见,我们才不会被假出家人和“神棍”欺骗和误导。

因此,如果大家遇到本文所说的这样犯邪恶知见和错误知见的出家人,请远离!

撰文:千里草

编辑:瑜伽根本/悦色

出家人带居士去找“神仙”看病,怪哉

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#第三世多杰羌佛正法 #第三世多杰羌佛#观世音菩萨

義雲高獲授英國皇家藝衛學院Fellow職稱 咸認華人之光

義雲高獲授英國皇家藝衛學院Fellow職稱 咸認華人之光

關於“第三世多杰羌佛”佛號的說明

二零零八年四月三日,由全球佛教出版社和世界法音出版社出版的《多杰羌佛第三世》記實一書在美國國會圖書館舉行了莊嚴隆重的首發儀式,美國國會圖書館並正式收藏此書,自此人們才知道原來一直廣受大家尊敬的義雲高大師、仰諤益西諾布大法王,被世界佛教各大教派的領袖或攝政王、大活佛行文認證,就是宇宙始祖報身佛多杰羌佛的第三世降世,佛號為第三世多杰羌佛,從此,人們就以“南無第三世多杰羌佛”來稱呼了。這就猶如釋迦牟尼佛未成佛前,其名號為悉達多太子,但自釋迦牟尼佛成佛以後,就改稱“南無釋迦牟尼佛”了,所以,我們現在稱“南無第三世多杰羌佛”。尤其是,二零一二年十二月十二日,美國國會參議院第614號決議正式以His Holiness來冠名第三世多杰羌佛(即 H.H.第三世多杰羌佛),從此南無第三世多杰羌佛的稱位已定性。而且,第三世多杰羌佛也是政府法定的名字,以前的“義雲高”和大師、總持大法王的尊稱已經不存在了。但是,這個新聞是在南無第三世多杰羌佛佛號未公佈之前刊登的,那時人們還不瞭解佛陀的真正身份,所以,為了尊重歷史的真實,我們在新聞中仍然保留未法定第三世多杰羌佛稱號前所用的名字,但大家要清楚,除H.H.第三世多杰羌佛的名字是合法的以外,在未法定之前的名字已經不存在了。

己有兩百多年歷史的英國皇家藝術學院將兩百多年來懸而未發的 FELLOW證書證章發給義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)後,由於世界各地新聞媒體爭相報導及轉載,引起世界各地藝術界強烈的迴響,加之義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)創始的韻雕作品,成為世界上第一次無法複製的藝術,在美洲國家組織及國會展覽,引起巨大轟動,未曾到現場親臨參觀的人士,難免產生疑問,為此,他們通過關係親臨現場參觀大師的韻雕作品及中國繪畫藝街,各個驚嘆,心悅誠服 。

英國皇家藝術學院於二零零四年二月十日在美國首都華盛頓英國駐美國大使館,為世界著名的藝術大家,中國畫巨匠,超越自然美的韻雕的創始人義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)頒授“Fellowship" 職稱,當場授以證章與證書,此為英國皇家藝術學院成立兩百年第一位受頒FELLOW的藝術家,以表彰其藝術成就的登峰造極,確認了他對世界人類藝術的卓越貢獻,此一消息傳出,世界各地的報章雜誌爭相報導,全世界藝術家為之震撼,影響深遠。

據了解,台灣的中央通訊社、中央日報 、太平洋日報、台灣日報、東森新聞報、奇摩雅虎新聞、新浪綱、蕃薯藤、網路家庭;美國ASIAN JOURNAL、國際日報、世界日報、華盛頓新聞報、星島日報、天天日報、華府郵報;泰國的世界日報、京華中原、星暹日報、中華日報、亞洲日報、新中原報及英文報BUSINESS DAY …等世界各地的新聞媒體爭相報導轉載義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)此一盛大殊榮,華人之光 。

英國皇家藝術學院早在 1768年由英國國王喬治三世創建,距今已有200多年的歷史,直至今日的獲英國皇室恩賜特權,皇家藝術學院的受到英國女王的眷顧,學院新主席人選的任命需向女王報告並得到女王御駕的同意,其院長的任命亦須正式向女王報告,皇家學院的重心是皇家藝術學院及一百位皇家院士。皇家藝術學院是英國最古老的學院,以訓練下一代未來藝術家的搖籃著稱於世,是世界知名的藝術學府 。

皇家藝術學院的主席菲力浦·金 PHILIP KING在授稱致詞中宣布,義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)是英國皇家藝術學院建院200多年來一直期待而未能獲得的傑出藝術人物,今天終於獲得,這是皇家藝術學院一大幸事,他們能夠榮幸地為偉大的藝術家義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)授稱Fellowship,這是該院二百多年來一件非常重要和光榮的事情,而且這也是該院成立以來第一次授稱Fellowship,該院擁有院士100名,但是200多年來一直沒有人擔任上述 Fellow,義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)是本院第一位Fellow,這一崇高職稱是為世界最傑出著名的藝術家授稱的。

世界各地的藝術家對於義雲高大師( H.H.第三世多杰羌佛)為何能夠成為英國皇家藝術學院兩百多年來第一位FELLOW,極為好奇,更對大師的作品竟然被稱為世界上第 一次出現無法被複製的作品,更是疑惑,因此向有關單位諮詢求證,當他們到現場看過韻雕作品及大師中國畫藝術之後,各個驚嘆叫絕,終於了解大師作為英國皇家藝術學院兩百多年來第一位Fellow是理所當然的事 。 韻雕藝術的創始成功顯示大師是正宗佛教中五明工巧的登峰造極,實乃中華民族之光。

義雲高獲授英國皇家藝衛學院Fellow職稱 咸認華人之光

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第三世多杰羌佛 #第三世多杰羌佛正法 #第三世多杰羌佛法音 #第三世多杰羌佛藝術 #義雲高 #義雲高大師 #义云高 #义云高大师  #DorjeChangBuddhaIII #MasterWanKoYee  #MasterYiYunGao

20. The Monkey King and the Water Demon [Attentiveness]

20. The Monkey King and the Water Demon [Attentiveness]

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old, volume 1, Prince Goodspeaker, Stories 1-50

Once upon a time, far away in a deep forest, there was a nation of 80,000 monkeys. They had a king who was unusually large, as big as a fawn. He was not only big in body, he was also ‘large in mind’. After all, he was the Bodhisatta — the Enlightenment Being.

One day, he advised his monkey nation by saying, “My subjects, there are poisonous fruits in this deep forest, and ponds possessed by demons. So if you see any unusual fruit or unknown pond, do not eat or drink until you ask me first." Paying close attention to their wise king, all the monkeys agreed to follow his advice.

Later on, they came to an unknown pond. Even though they were all tired out and thirsty from searching for food, no one would drink without first asking the monkey king. So they sat in the trees and on the ground around the pond.

When he arrived, the monkey king asked them, “Did anyone drink the water?" They replied, “No, your majesty, we followed your instructions." He said, “Well done."

Then he walked along the bank, around the pond. He examined the footprints of the animals that had gone into the water, and saw that none came out again! So he realized this pond must be possessed by a water demon. He said to the 80,000 monkeys, “This pond is possessed by a water demon. Do not anybody go into it."

After a little while, the water demon saw that none of the monkeys went into the water to drink. So he rose out of the middle of the pond, taking the shape of a frightening monster. He had a big blue belly, a white face with bulging green eyes, and red claws and feet. He said, “Why are you just sitting around? Come into the pond and drink at once!"

The monkey king said to the horrible monster, “Are you the water demon who owns this pond?" “Yes, I am," said he. “Do you eat whoever goes into the water?" asked the king. “Yes, I do," he answered, “including even birds. I eat them all. And when you are forced by your thirst to come into the pond and drink, I will enjoy eating you, the biggest monkey, most of all!" He grinned, and saliva dripped down his hairy chin.

But the monkey king with the well-trained mind remained calm. He said, “I will not let you eat me or a single one of my followers. And yet, we will drink all the water we want!" The water demon grunted, “Impossible! How will you do that?" The monkey king replied, “Each one of the 80,000 of us will drink using bamboo shoots as straws. And you will not be able to touch us!"

Of course, anyone who has seen bamboo knows there is a difficulty. Bamboo grows in sections, one after another, with a knot between each one. Any one section is too small, so the demon could grab the monkey, pull him under and gobble him up. But the knots make it impossible to sip through more than one section.

The monkey king was very special, and that is why so many followed him. In the past, he had practiced goodness and trained his mind with such effort and attention, that he had developed very fine qualities of mind. This is why he was said to be ‘large in mind’, not because he simply had a ‘big brain’.

The Enlightenment Being was able to keep these fine qualities in his mind, and produce a very unlikely event – a miracle. First, he took a young bamboo shoot, blew through it to make the knots disappear, and used it to sip water from the pond. Then, amazing as it may sound, he waved his hand and all the bamboo growing around that one pond lost their knots. They became a new kind of bamboo.

Then, all his 80,000 followers picked bamboo shoots and easily drank their fill from the pond. The water demon could not believe his green eyes. Grumbling to himself, he slid back under the surface, leaving only gurgling bubbles behind.

The moral is: “Test the water before jumping in."

20. The Monkey King and the Water Demon [Attentiveness]

Link: https://hhdorjechangbuddhaiiiinfo.com/2022/03/28/20-the-monkey-king-and-the-water-demon-attentiveness/

INTERPRETER’S INTRODUCTION – BUDDHIST TALES FOR YOUNG AND OLD, VOLUME 1, STORIES 1-50

#Buddhisttalesforyoungandold #Buddhiststories #storiesforkids #moralstories #Buddha #Jatakastories #PansiyaPanasJataka

中國畫巨 匠超越 自然美的韻雕創始人

中國畫巨 匠超越 自然美的韻雕創始人

義雲高藝術家榮獲英國推崇

皇家藝術學院頒授證章與證書

藝院創立已二百餘年首位獲榮銜的傑出藝術家

關於第三世多杰羌佛”佛號的說明

二零零八年四月三日,由全球佛教出版社和世界法音出版社出版的《多杰羌佛第三世》記實一書在美國國會圖書館舉行了莊嚴隆重的首發儀式,美國國會圖書館並正式收藏此書,自此人們才知道原來一直廣受大家尊敬的義雲高大師、仰諤益西諾布大法王,被世界佛教各大教派的領袖或攝政王、大活佛行文認證,就是宇宙始祖報身佛多杰羌佛的第三世降世,佛號為第三世多杰羌佛,從此,人們就以“南無第三世多杰羌佛”來稱呼了。這就猶如釋迦牟尼佛未成佛前,其名號為悉達多太子,但自釋迦牟尼佛成佛以後,就改稱“南無釋迦牟尼佛”了,所以,我們現在稱“南無第三世多杰羌佛”。尤其是,二零一二年十二月十二日,美國國會參議院第614號決議正式以His Holiness來冠名第三世多杰羌佛(即 H.H.第三世多杰羌佛),從此南無第三世多杰羌佛的稱位已定性。而且,第三世多杰羌佛也是政府法定的名字,以前的“義雲高”和大師、總持大法王的尊稱已經不存在了。但是,這個新聞是在南無第三世多杰羌佛佛號未公佈之前刊登的,那時人們還不瞭解佛陀的真正身份,所以,為了尊重歷史的真實,我們在新聞中仍然保留未法定第三世多杰羌佛稱號前所用的名字,但大家要清楚,除H.H.第三世多杰羌佛的名字是合法的以外,在未法定之前的名字已經不存在了。

英國皇家藝術學院十日在華盛頓英國駐美國大使館,為世界著名的藝術大家、中國畫巨匠、超越自然美的韻雕的創始人義雲高(H.H. 第三世多杰羌佛)頒授一項崇高的 Fellowship 頭銜,授以證章與證書,並推崇義他對世界藝術上的卓越貢獻。

英國皇家藝術學院早在一七六八年由英國國王喬治三世創建,距今已有二百多年的歷史,是英國最古老的學院,以訓練下一代未來藝衛家的搖籃著稱於世,是世界知名的藝俯學府。

皇家藝術學院的主席菲力浦·金(Philip King)在頒證致詞中宣布,英國皇家藝術學院有著悠久的歷史,能夠榮幸地為偉大的藝術家和精神領袖義雲高大師(H.H. 第三世多杰羌佛)授稱 「Fellowship」,是該院非常重要和光榮的事情,也是該院成立二百年來首次 Fellowship。

他指出,過去義雲高是英國皇家藝術學院建院以來一直期待而尚未獲得這項榮銜傑出藝術人物,今天他終於獲得了這項殊榮,這是皇家藝術學院極為榮幸的事。該院擁有院士一百人,一直沒有人擔任過FELLOW,義雲高(H.H. 第三世多杰羌佛)第一位FELLOW。

英國駐美國大使館文化參事安迪·馬凱出席頒證儀式,由英國駐美國大使館大衛·曼寧爵士在英國皇家藝術學院主席菲力浦·金和院長布蘭登鼐倫的陪同,會見義雲高和夫人王玉花教授,對義雲高(H.H. 第三世多杰羌佛)獲得的成就表達了最高敬意與祝賀之意。

中國畫巨 匠超越 自然美的韻雕創始人

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#第三世多杰羌佛 #第三世多杰羌佛正法 #第三世多杰羌佛法音 #第三世多杰羌佛藝術 #義雲高 #義雲高大師 #义云高 #义云高大师  #DorjeChangBuddhaIII #MasterWanKoYee  #MasterYiYunGao